Tag Archive for panic attack

Coping with Panic Attacks

Cause: A Panic attack may be the result of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. They can also be caused by a specific phobic trigger, for example, if you have a phobia of spiders then seeing one may cause a panic attack. They can also occur for no obvious reason. Because a panic attack is a scary experience in itself, you fear having another, making the anxiety cycle worse.

Effect: During a panic attack, a person has an overwhelming sense of fear and may feel that they have lost touch with reality. Nausea, sweating, shaking, palpitations, a choking sensation and faintness are common symptoms, which usually peak within ten minutes.

Solutions: During a panic attack, it may be helpful to breathe in and out of your cupped hands, as this makes you re-breathe the excess oxygen you are taking in and reduces the frightening sensations of hyperventilation. Try to distract yourself by focusing on something you can see, or visualise yourself in a calm, safe place. Relaxation techniques such as yoga and meditation may help to prevent further attacks. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is another option, and SSRI antidepressants may help cases of severe Panic Disorder.

The help for a panic attack can come in a wide variety of forms. The most important first step for the individual sufferer is to form the determination to overcome the panic disorder. Once that has been accomplished, that individual will be able to live a life that is closer to normal.

A panic attack or a panic disorder frequently will result from a mental issue the person possesses. There are many varieties of panic attacks. They all seem to have one thing or another to do with the mind and the way an individual perceives things.

Doctors And Psychiatrists

We have determined that panic attacks result from our mental processes. Therefore, we need to consult with those doctors who have studied and learned about such things. Psychologists and psychiatrists are the primary specialists for people who suffer from panic disorders.

Seeking help for panic attacks disorders is something that individuals should do early on. The goal is to prevent the development of deeper issues and conditions. Those issues and conditions often are connected to panic disorders.

Our medical doctors usually will recommend the traditional methods of help for panic attack disorders. These traditional methods usually involve some therapy combined with medication.

The intention is to get the individual on the road to recovery, wellness and stability. You can expect the doctor to make a preliminary assessment before prescribing any methods of help for panic attacks.

Alternative Help For Panic Attacks

Alternative medicine has several different remedies for how to cure panic attacks. Alternative medicine usually places the focus more on the natural ways to treat these disorders.

Customarily herbs and some alternative methods are prescribed for people seeking help for panic attack disorders. There are numerous herbs that can naturally combat the anxious and fearful feelings people get during panic attacks.

In addition to the herbs, there are the alternative methods such as massage, aromatherapy, hypnosis, acupuncture and countless others. These alternative methods to provide help forpanic attacks disorders can be helpful to a certain extent.

There are several forms of panic attacks that cannot be treated readily with the alternative methods. That is because it takes time for some of the alternative methods to be effective. A few of these methods, such as hypnosis, can have lasting effects on people.

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Help

Group therapy helps you build relationships with others who understand what you’ve been through, PTSD groups have a number of advantages, including provision of a natural support group, the ability to reach more patients, and greater cost efficiency. It can also help you feel more in control of your emotions, have fewer symptoms, and enjoy life again.

A growing percentage of PTSD patients now receive successful treatment as more is learned about the condition and multiple therapies are employed to fight its often-devastating effects on health and quality of life. Group therapy is one of those therapies, which have been found very beneficial, as the groups are usually rather small and the survivor can get to know and feel comfortable in small groups. So even therapists now are suggesting group therapy as a form of processing the trauma.

Sharing with the group also can help you build self-confidence and trust. The participants with trauma-related symptoms and depression in a group can also improved significantly on trauma-related symptoms and depression, it can also reduce symptoms by encouraging the affected person to talk about the event, to express feelings, and share their experience of the event.

One reason that treatment is often unsought by victims of the condition is that virtually any address or discussion of the offending trauma is bound to be quite painful, and stirs in the victim memories and emotions tied back to the event. This is where a group has its advantages, they do not need to sign up or fill out any forms, or feel that attending the group will be traced back to them, for employment reasons or family reasons; it all very antonymous

It is recommended that at the beginning of each PTSD group meeting that an inspirational reading or other form of centering is done for the survivors, it is best if this is something non-denominational as any sort of affiliation to groups or religions can feel like a threat to them. Then at the close of the meeting another type of closing so that all the attendees can get emotional balance prior to leaving.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is experienced by more than 10 million people in the US according to the National Institutes of Health, and that number is growing with veterans returning from war; so group meetings have a beneficial effects for the psychological distress, depression, anxiety and social adjustment for the survivors. It is also very cost effective and many are unable to hold steady, productive employment.

Coping with Anxiety

Ranges from mild, persistent worry to disabling fear and full-blown panic attacks.

Causes: Anxiety may be the result of a traumatic experience, a genetic predisposition, or an imbalance of brain chemicals. It can also occur for no apparent reason.

Effect: Generalized Anxiety Disorder causes you to feel restless, impatient and constantly ‘on edge’. You may suffer from panic attacks, dizziness, fatigue, palpitations, aching muscles, excessive sweating, digestive problems and insomnia.

Phobias are also a type of anxiety disorder. Someone with a specific phobia knows the exact trigger for their anxiety, for example spiders (arachnophobia), leaving the house (agoraphobia) or entering small spaces such as lifts (claustrophobia).

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder arises after a very traumatic or life-threatening event, and usually includes flash-backs.

Social Anxiety Disorder is diagnosed when a person experiences disabling anxiety in social situations.

Solutions:

Relaxation techniques are helpful in combating anxiety disorders. These include breathing exercises and meditation.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

Flooding and Exposure Therapy are techniques in which you are forced to confront the things you fear, either suddenly (for specific phobias) or gradually, until you no longer respond to the trigger with anxiety.

Medication may be prescribed when anxiety is severe.

Cutting out caffeine and nicotine may help.

Yoga and pilates.

Exercise such as brisk walking helps to reduce anxiety.

Anxiety disorders are serious medical illnesses that affect approximately 19 million American adults. These disorders fill people’s lives with overwhelming anxiety and fear. Unlike the relatively mild, brief anxiety caused by a stressful event such as a business presentation or a first date, anxiety disorders are chronic, relentless, and can grow progressively worse if not treated.

Effective treatments for anxiety disorders are available, and research is yielding new, improved therapies that can help most people with anxiety disorders lead productive, fulfilling lives. If you think you have an anxiety disorder, you should seek information and treatment.

This feature will help you identify the symptoms of anxiety disorders, explain the role of research in understanding the causes of these conditions, describe effective treatments, help you learn how to obtain treatment and work with a doctor or therapist, and suggest ways to make treatment more effective.

The anxiety disorders discussed in this feature arepanic disorder,

  • obsessive-compulsive disorder,
  • post-traumatic stress disorder,
  • social phobia (or social anxiety disorder),
  • specific phobias, and
  • generalized anxiety disorder.
  • Each anxiety disorder has its own distinct features, but they are all bound together by the common theme of excessive, irrational fear and dread.

Discuss coping with anxiety

Am I Having a Nervous Breakdown

Are You Experiencing a Nervous Breakdown?

Although it appears to be increasingly falling out of the common lexicon, the term “nervous breakdown” was once used to describe any number of mental health problems that appeared to strike suddenly. Unfortunately, the term is often used loosely or casually, and sometimes, as in films and TV, for comic effect. But is there really such as thing as a nervous breakdown? Well yes, and no.

Yes – a person can indeed ‘break down’ suddenly. The human body is a fragile mechanism that, when put under too much stress, will stop functioning normally. A person exposed to long-term, unrelenting severe stress is particularly vulnerable to experiencing a ‘breakdown.’ How does a breakdown manifest itself? The primary characteristic of a breakdown usually involves some sudden disintegration of the self. This means that an individual who usually follows a set pattern of behaviors will suddenly break away from their routine. Imagine this scenario: a person wakes every morning, goes to work, seems to function normally, visits with friends as usual, and then returns home. Imagine this person suddenly waking one morning and unable to get up. They have lost their drive, their ability to function normally, to communicate with family or friends. Perhaps they are even incapable of dressing or eating. This person is experiencing a nervous breakdown.

What other types of symptoms might be described as those associated with having a nervous breakdown? Some individuals might experience the uncontrollable need to cry, loss of energy, withdrawal, confusion, despair, inability to think clearly, sleep disruption or insomnia, loss of pleasure in everyday activities, feelings of worthlessness and depression. These “down and out” feelings are characteristic of depressive disorders.

Some individuals have breakdowns that manifest symptoms of psychosis. Breakdowns involving psychosis may involve hearing voices, seeing visions, feelings of paranoia, feelings of being pursued, feeling sensations that are not really present, grandiose or delusional behavior, bizarre public behavior, feeling of jealousy, and feelings of violence.

Whatever the nature of the breakdown, all breakdowns have in common the inability to function as normal.

What is a nervous breakdown really? A person who experiences symptoms of a nervous breakdown is suffering from some sort of mental disorder. That is, despite what we used to think, a nervous breakdown in and of itself is not an illness or disease. They are merely symptomatic of a larger problem. In fact, no legitimate physician or mental health professional would ever diagnose someone as having a nervous breakdown. The characteristics of a nervous breakdown can be symptomatic of a large variety of mental illnesses. The most common illness that resembles these characteristics is a Major Depressive episode. Other disorders that are related to what we think of as a nervous breakdown include panic attacks, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and other trauma disorders, acute stress disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder, depression, and mood disorders. All of these mental disorders are characteristic of what many laypeople would characterize as a nervous breakdown.

Who is most likely to suffer from a nervous breakdown? Almost anyone who is subjected to undue stress is capable of experiencing a nervous breakdown. For instance, any person who has been subjected to extreme stress and trauma is vulnerable to experiencing a disorder that mimics the general perception of a nervous breakdown. For instance, a young person returning from battle may experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. A woman experiencing severe depression after the birth of her child may experience post-partum depression.

How can a person suffering any of the characteristics of a nervous breakdown get help? Sometimes the hardest part of recovery is getting the person to visit a doctor. For some kinds of mental disorders, a nervous breakdown can be a blessing in disguise. An individual suffering from severe anxiety or depression may find her self speaking to a psychotherapist for the first time. A person who suffered alone for long time may suddenly find himself getting better with medical attention. In many fortunate cases, the person who experienced the nervous breakdown may emerge from therapy stronger and healthier than ever before. Treatments can include antidepressant and psychotropic medications, psychotherapy, and prescribed periods of rest.

Prevention of nervous breakdowns is an oft-ignored subject that researchers are beginning to study. The characterization of a nervous breakdown as something that happens very suddenly can be misleading. In many cases, symptoms of the coming breakdown are present, but either the individual or their family and friends ignore them. Individuals who sense themselves becoming increasingly stressed, depressed, angry, or violent are encouraged to seek help immediately.

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Military PTSD

Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be considered a “young” diagnosis. It was not until 1980 that the diagnosis of PTSD as we know it today came to be. However, throughout history, people have recognized that exposure to combat situations can have a profound negative impact on the minds and bodies of those involved in these situations.

In fact, the diagnosis of PTSD originates from observations of the effect of combat on soldiers. The grouping of symptoms that we now refer to as PTSD has previously been described in the past as “combat fatigue,” “shell shock,” or “war neurosis.”

PTSD Rates in Military Soldiers

It is not surprising that high rates of PTSD have been found among soldiers from World War II, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, and the war in Iraq.

PTSD Rates in Soldiers, from World War II On

PTSD Rates in Soldiers from the Iraq War

PTSD Not Due to Combat

As you can see from the above articles, PTSD stemming from combat exposure is quite common. However, people in the military may also be at risk for experiencing other types of traumatic events. In particular, women in the military may be at high risk for experiencing a sexual trauma, often referred to as military sexual trauma (MST).

Military Sexual Trauma: An Overview

What Increases Risk for PTSD?

People serving during wartime are likely to be exposed to a number of traumatic or highly stressful events. However, not everyone eventually goes on to develop PTSD. Some people may be more vulnerable to developing PTSD after coming into contact with a traumatic event, whereas others may be more resilient. Some factors that may protect someone from developing PTSD have been identified.

Vulnerability for PTSD

The Effect of War on a Soldier’s Family

Not only is war difficult for a military soldier, but it is also incredibly difficult for that soldier’s family. War can have a tremendous impact on the mental health of a soldier’s loved ones.

Children of Iraq War Soldiers Have High Levels of Stress

PTSD and Relationship Violence

Understanding a Loved One’s PTSD

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Dealing with Panic Attacks

Panic attacks occur due to overwhelming anxiety and fear. Experiencing it, is the most uncomfortable situation in a person’s life. It gives a sense of dying. Difficulty comes in trying to break out of the attacks and removing yourself from the situation which can even make the attacks even more worse. Understanding what it is will bring great relief and will make one realize that it is quite common. Once a person gets to know what it is, he will definitely develop a curiosity to know how to manage a panic attack. There are many tips to manage a panic attack as given below. It can be as short as few seconds or it may last up to an hour. Regardless of how you get them, they are manageable and can be treated.

Managing panic attacks does not always go with taking medicines and consulting a doctor. There are other proper prevention methods which are available to manage such panic or anxiety attacks. The following points are some which could help you to manage these attacks.

  • Once you feel it coming breathe slowly in and out of a paper bag. A paper bag will help your oxygen levels to return to normal.
  • Avoid junk foods and drinks outside. Have regular meals to keep your blood sugar level stable.
  • Dont bottle up your emotions. Always find someone may be a family member or a friend and share your thoughts so that you feel relaxed.
  • Listen to some good music and do a pleasurable task allowing the panic to subside.
  • Once u sense an attack, close your eyes, breathe slowly and deeply and always keep in mind that you are safe.
  • Firmly tell yourself that the symptoms you feel are temporary and they are not harmful.
  • Avoiding exposure to unnecessary stress helps to managing these attacks.
  • Try to exercise on a daily basis to have a healthy physic which keeps you away from panic attacks.

Managing panic attacks is simple if we get to know the cause for it. It is always better to avoid the circumstances that cause the attack. Severe attacks can be managed by learning how to breathe properly. You can use a breathing technique that you are comfortable with, once you feel an attack.

Get Help Dealing with Panic Attacks

Help with Anxiety Attacks

There’s a great deal of interest in how to stop panic attacks and anxiety without medication nowadays. In the main, sufferers just don’t want to be dependent on mind-numbing drugs such as antidepressants and tranquilizers for long periods of their lives. They would much prefer to handle things totally naturally.

Here you’ll learn of one such natural approach to eliminating your anxiety and panic attacks…

FOREWORD ON STOPPING PANIC ATTACKS AND ANXIETY WITHOUT MEDICATION

When considering how to stop panic attacks and anxiety without medication, there are several important things you should bear in mind…

(1). The first thing is that we aren’t dealing with a mental condition, rather we’re dealing with a behavioural one. You are not going mad. And, because it’s behavioural, it can be corrected with the proper guidance and information.

(2). Another consideration is that an attack cannot cause you any harm, you are perfectly safe. You may feel as though you are about to, but you won’t die. Your body is quite capable of handling the terrifying symptoms of an attack. In fact, it’s your body’s fight or flight response that triggers your attacks in the first place!

(3). Although you may think you lack courage, you certainly don’t. Remember that, on a daily basis, you face a range of challenges that the average person very rarely has to.

(4). Because of point (1) above, you don’t have to worry about being stuck with your anxiety problem for the rest of your life. It can be cured, with the correct approach. These are very important points to understand because they are all positive ones and so form a solid starting point for your cure.

MAINSTREAM TREATMENT FOR PANIC ATTACKS AND ANXIETY

You have no doubt visited your doctor and been diagnosed with general anxiety and panic attacks. And, as in most cases, you’ve been prescribed drugs, usually antidepressants, tranquilizers and even beta blockers. You may also have been referred to a therapist. The problem here is that neither of these address a fundamental aspect of your ongoing problem, and that is that they don’t address your fear of having another panic attack.

FEAR OF PANIC ATTACKS AND YOUR ANXIETY CYCLE

You see, your unconscious or conscious fear of your next attack can actually trigger such an attack. But where does this fear come from? It’s so simple really. The experience of your first attack was so terrifying that you live (consciously or subconsciously) in dread of another. This is understandable. The problem is that as long as this persists it only adds to your already high anxiety levels. So the key is to break out of this cycle of anxiety by getting rid of your fear of another panic attack. If you can do this then you are able to address your underlying general anxiety much more effectively and so eliminate it. But if mainstream treatment cannot do this effectively what other options are there?

HOW TO STOP PANIC ATTACKS AND ANXIETY WITHOUT MEDICATION

One serious option is to get rid of your fear of panic attacks by taking a counter-intuitive approach. By that I mean, instead of running away or hiding from your next panic attack, i.e. never putting yourself in a position where one might occur, you actually tackle your fear head-on. For example, try to make yourself have an attack right this second. I know that, try as hard as you might, you cannot. You’ve faced up to it. You met the challenge head on. And so the next time you feel an attack about to come on, recognize it for what it is. You now know what causes it. Know that it cannot harm you and will end shortly. Even repeat to yourself that you know what it is and that you aren’t in danger. And focus outwards on things around you, not inwards on your symptoms.

I’ve actually, in my head, told an attack when it began to ‘do its worst.’ In other words meet the attack head on and wrestle back control. There is no doubt that you can eliminate panic attacks and anxiety using totally natural techniques. And by now understanding that these attacks cannot cause harm and that your fear of them is what is actually holding you back, you are better positioned to go on and get your freedom back. So, no more fear of going out because of the fear of an attack, no more putting off holiday plans or business travel, no more fear of getting stuck in traffic or on trains, etc., and no more living a very trapped existence.

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