Tag Archive for military

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Help

Group therapy helps you build relationships with others who understand what you’ve been through, PTSD groups have a number of advantages, including provision of a natural support group, the ability to reach more patients, and greater cost efficiency. It can also help you feel more in control of your emotions, have fewer symptoms, and enjoy life again.

A growing percentage of PTSD patients now receive successful treatment as more is learned about the condition and multiple therapies are employed to fight its often-devastating effects on health and quality of life. Group therapy is one of those therapies, which have been found very beneficial, as the groups are usually rather small and the survivor can get to know and feel comfortable in small groups. So even therapists now are suggesting group therapy as a form of processing the trauma.

Sharing with the group also can help you build self-confidence and trust. The participants with trauma-related symptoms and depression in a group can also improved significantly on trauma-related symptoms and depression, it can also reduce symptoms by encouraging the affected person to talk about the event, to express feelings, and share their experience of the event.

One reason that treatment is often unsought by victims of the condition is that virtually any address or discussion of the offending trauma is bound to be quite painful, and stirs in the victim memories and emotions tied back to the event. This is where a group has its advantages, they do not need to sign up or fill out any forms, or feel that attending the group will be traced back to them, for employment reasons or family reasons; it all very antonymous

It is recommended that at the beginning of each PTSD group meeting that an inspirational reading or other form of centering is done for the survivors, it is best if this is something non-denominational as any sort of affiliation to groups or religions can feel like a threat to them. Then at the close of the meeting another type of closing so that all the attendees can get emotional balance prior to leaving.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is experienced by more than 10 million people in the US according to the National Institutes of Health, and that number is growing with veterans returning from war; so group meetings have a beneficial effects for the psychological distress, depression, anxiety and social adjustment for the survivors. It is also very cost effective and many are unable to hold steady, productive employment.

Military PTSD

Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be considered a “young” diagnosis. It was not until 1980 that the diagnosis of PTSD as we know it today came to be. However, throughout history, people have recognized that exposure to combat situations can have a profound negative impact on the minds and bodies of those involved in these situations.

In fact, the diagnosis of PTSD originates from observations of the effect of combat on soldiers. The grouping of symptoms that we now refer to as PTSD has previously been described in the past as “combat fatigue,” “shell shock,” or “war neurosis.”

PTSD Rates in Military Soldiers

It is not surprising that high rates of PTSD have been found among soldiers from World War II, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, and the war in Iraq.

PTSD Rates in Soldiers, from World War II On

PTSD Rates in Soldiers from the Iraq War

PTSD Not Due to Combat

As you can see from the above articles, PTSD stemming from combat exposure is quite common. However, people in the military may also be at risk for experiencing other types of traumatic events. In particular, women in the military may be at high risk for experiencing a sexual trauma, often referred to as military sexual trauma (MST).

Military Sexual Trauma: An Overview

What Increases Risk for PTSD?

People serving during wartime are likely to be exposed to a number of traumatic or highly stressful events. However, not everyone eventually goes on to develop PTSD. Some people may be more vulnerable to developing PTSD after coming into contact with a traumatic event, whereas others may be more resilient. Some factors that may protect someone from developing PTSD have been identified.

Vulnerability for PTSD

The Effect of War on a Soldier’s Family

Not only is war difficult for a military soldier, but it is also incredibly difficult for that soldier’s family. War can have a tremendous impact on the mental health of a soldier’s loved ones.

Children of Iraq War Soldiers Have High Levels of Stress

PTSD and Relationship Violence

Understanding a Loved One’s PTSD

Discuss Military PTSD in our Messageboard