Tag Archive for change

Happiness Quotes

 

Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly.

LEO TOLSTOY, War and Peace

If one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere.

JANE AUSTEN, Mansfield Park

We ne’er can be

Made happy by compulsion.

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, The Three Graves

Happiness hates the timid! So does science!

EUGENE O’NEILL, Strange Interlude

Every object, every being, is a jar full of delight.

RUMI, Essential Rumi

It’s so hard to forget pain, but it’s even harder to remember sweetness. We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.

CHUCK PALAHNIUK, Diary

Happiness always looks small while you hold it in your hands, but let it go, and you learn at once how big and precious it is.

MAXIM GORKY, John Mason’s Know Your Limits

What is the worth of anything,
But for the happiness ’twill bring?

RICHARD OWEN CAMBRIDGE, Learning

Happiness consumes itself like a flame. It cannot burn for ever, it must go out, and the presentiment of its end destroys it at its very peak.

AUGUST STRINDBERG, A Dream Play

There is no truth more thoroughly established than that there exists in the economy and course of nature an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness.

GEORGE WASHINGTON, First Inaugural Address, Apr. 30, 1789

Happiness is that state of consciousness which proceeds from the achievement of one’s values.

AYN RAND, Atlas Shrugged

Happiness makes up in height for what it lacks in length.

ROBERT FROST, as quoted in Vernon McLellan’s Wise Words and Quotes

Give a man health and a course to steer; and he’ll never stop to trouble about whether he’s happy or not.

GEORGE BERNARD SHAW, Captain Brassbound’s Conversion

We can smile, breathe, walk, and eat our meals in a way that allows us to be in touch with the abundance of happiness that is available. We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living. We know how to sacrifice ten years for a diploma and we are willing to work very hard to get a job, a car, a house, and so on. But we have difficulty remembering that we are alive in the present moment, the only moment there is for us to be alive.

THICH NHAT HANH, Peace is Every Step

What we need for our happiness is often close at hand, if we knew but how to seek for it.

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE, American Note-Books, Aug. 22, 1837

I kept looking for happiness, and then I realized: This is it. It’s a moment, and it comes, and it goes, and it’ll come back again. I yearn for things, but at the same time I’m just peaceful.

NICOLE KIDMAN, Vanity Fair, Oct. 2007

What is earthly happiness? that phantom of which we hear so much, and see so little; whose promises are constantly given and constantly broken, but as constantly believed; that cheats us with the sound instead of the substance, and with the blossom instead of the fruit. Like Juno, she is a goddess in pursuit, but a cloud in possession.

CHARLES CALEB COLTON, Lacon

Happiness expanded like an explosion inside me–so extreme, so violent that I wasn’t sure I’d survive it.

STEPHENIE MEYER, Breaking Dawn

Those who possess that treasure which no thief can take away,
Which, though on suppliants freely spent, increaseth day by day,
The source of inward happiness which shall outlast the earth–
To them e’en kings should yield the palm, and own their higher worth.

BHARTRHARI, “The Praise of the Wise Man”

How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness, is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure.

WILLIAM JAMES, The Varieties of Religious Experience

Whatever the philosophers may say, it remains true that, from the first hour of man’s waking consciousness until that consciousness ceases, his most ardent desire is to be happy, and that the moment of his most profound regret is when he becomes convinced that on this earth perfect happiness cannot be found. Here is the problem which gives to the various ages of human history their special characters. Blithe are those ages when young and progressive nations still hope for happiness, or when men believe that in some new formula of philosophy, or of religion, or perhaps in some new industrial programme, the secret of human happiness has at last been found. Gloomy are those ages in which, as in our time, great masses of people are burdened with the conviction that all these familiar formulas have been illusions, and when persons of the keenest insight say–as they are now saying–that the very word happiness has in it a note of melancholy. No sooner, we are told, does one speak of happiness than it flees from him. In its very nature it lies beyond the sphere of practical realization.

KARL HILTY, Happiness: Essays on the Meaning of Life

The duty of happiness becomes clearer when we see how it affects others. It is the merry heart that makes the cheerful countenance, and it is the cheerful countenance that spreads cheer to make other hearts merry. The sunny soul brings sunshine everywhere. A bright and happy temperament is a great social asset, adding to the happiness of the world.

HUGH BLACK, Happiness

As the sea is beautiful not only in calm but also in storm, so is happiness found not only in peace but also in strife.

IVAN PANIN, Thoughts

The journey to true happiness and to happiness now is not a journey of physical distance or time; it is one of personal “self-recovery,” where we remember and reconnect consciously to an inner potential for joy–a paradise lost–waiting to be found.

ROBERT HOLDEN, Happiness Now: Timeless Wisdom for Feeling Good Fast

Happiness and freedom begin with a clear understanding of one principle: Some things are within our control, and some things are not. It is only after you have faced up to this fundamental rule and learned to distinguish between what you can and can’t control that inner tranquility and outer effectiveness become possible.

EPICTETUS, The Art of Living

Nothing prevents happiness like the memory of happiness.

ANDRE GIDE, Autumn Leaves

Surely happiness is reflective, like the light of heaven; and every countenance, bright with smiles, and glowing with innocent enjoyment, is a mirror transmitting to others the rays of a supreme and ever-shining benevolence.

WASHINGTON IRVING, Old Christmas

Happiness is the harvest of a quiet eye.

AUSTIN O’MALLEY, Keystones of Thought

To be happy you must be your own sunshine.

CHARLES EDWARD JERNINGHAM, The Maxims of Marmaduke.

Happiness quotes to download and share.

Low Self Esteem Advice

Low Self Esteem Advice and Definition

Webster’s dictionary defines self-esteem as a confidence and satisfaction in oneself; self-respect. Self-esteem (or self-image) is how you think and feel about yourself.

Someone with healthy self-esteem feels they are worthy and able to cope with life’s challenges. They have a positive, yet realistic view of themselves and their abilities. Even when things seem to go wrong, they are able to accept themselves and feel they are worthy. People with low self-esteem or low self-confidence doubt their abilities and have unrealistic expectations for themselves. Their sense of self-worth is excessively dependent on what others think and they often put themselves down or judge themselves very harshly.

To summarize, self-esteem is made up of the thoughts and feelings that you have about yourself and is influenced by the way you talk to yourself (i.e., your inner dialogue). As humans, one of our unique abilities is the awareness of ourselves. We are aware of what we do and our impact on others and ourselves. This ability allows us to live in a world with others and develop close relationships. Our internal voice judges our behavior on a daily basis and makes adjustments based on feedback from others. A person with low self-esteem has an overly critical voice with a negative slant; nothing is good enough, failures are highlighted and you are always criticized. Psychologist Eugene Sagan terms this voice “the pathological critic” – always looking for the negative and never seeing the positive.

How Does Self-Esteem Develop?

Our sense of ourselves develops throughout our lives. As infants and young children, much of our sense of self comes from our parents. When parents provide an accepting and nurturing environment, children develop a solid foundation on which to develop good feelings about themselves. If parents are excessively demanding or critical (or discourage moves toward independence), children may begin to doubt themselves and feel inadequate or unworthy. As children grow, attend school and develop peer relationships, successes and failures in these relationships affect self-esteem as well. Thus, the messages we are sent eventually become internalized and can become the messages we send ourselves. We then develop a set of assumptions and beliefs about ourselves based on prior experiences.

Critical Beliefs and Thought Patterns that Create Low Self-Esteem

There are many ways in which people talk to themselves. We may encourage ourselves during a difficult task, “Keep at it. You’re almost done. You can do it.” We may also talk to ourselves in a negative voice. Although it is important to evaluate ourselves accurately, if this voice is constant or very negative it can do harm to our self-esteem and is termed the “pathological critic”. The pathological critic keeps up a negative stream of self-talk. “You can’t do it. You’re stupid. You’ll never make it.” Frequent techniques used by the pathological critic which undermine self-esteem are:

Overgeneralization. If you did not do well in one situation, the pathological critic overgeneralizes to all situations – “I got a D on the quiz in Math today. I’m going to flunk that class and all the rest. I’ll never be able to graduate from college.”
Global Labeling.Your pathological critic uses pejorative labels to describe yourself rather than accurately describing your qualities. If you withdraw from a class you’re having difficulty in, you’re pathological critic may label you – “I’m a quitter. I never finish anything. I’m a loser.”
Minimization of the Positive.With the pathological critic, good things don’t count nearly as much as bad ones. You focus on the negative and discount the positive – “I won four tennis matches but lost one and that makes me feel terrible about myself.”
Comparing Yourself to Others.The pathological critic scans the room and finds the people who are better in some way. Person A is prettier, person B is smarter and person C is a better athlete. Somehow, these all get combined into one perfect person who has everything you should have and you are unworthy in comparison.
Ways to Improve Your Self-Esteem

Be Patient – Change takes time and is an ongoing process. Remember a time in the past when you learned a difficult skill. You didn’t learn to ride a bike or swim or rollerblade the first time out. It involved many attempts and many mistakes (and many bumps and bruises). Improving your self-esteem is the same kind of process.

Challenge your Pathological Critic

Notice the ways that you put yourself down. Make a list of the negative statements you make to yourself everyday.
Challenge each negative statement
a. “Just because I got a D on that test, doesn’t mean I won’t be able to graduate from college. I just need to talk to the professor and learn a new way of studying that material.”

b. “Dropping one class doesn’t mean I am a quitter. I’ve finished many other things in my life. It means that subject was difficult for me.”

Emphasize the Positive – Give yourself credit for everything you try, whether you succeed or not. Focus on the effort rather than on the end product.

Utilize “Thought Stopping” – When you find yourself thinking a negative thought about yourself, imagine a large stop sign and tell yourself to “STOP”. Switch to a more positive thought such as “I’m okay.” “I’m a good person”.

Set Realistic Goals – Start with small steps and give yourself credit for each little step you achieve. When your confidence is low, it takes an extra effort to even begin. Instead of worrying about being perfect, praise yourself for making an effort.

List the Positive – Make a list of positive things about yourself and post them in a place you see every day. Spend a few moments accepting the positive.

Fake it “Til You Make it – Tell yourself positive things even if you don’t believe them at first. Sometimes it may take awhile to see that you really are a worthwhile person, that others like you, and that you are succeeding.

Be Compassionate with Yourself – Frequently, we are more compassionate and accepting with others than with ourselves. Give yourself the same understanding and acceptance you give others.

Recommended Books to Read

Self-Esteem, Revised Edition. Matthew McKay & Patrick Fanning, Oakland, CA: New Harbinger, 1995. This book describes self-esteem and the negative messages we give ourselves. It follows with a discussion of ways to counter the “pathological critic” and how to deal with shoulds, mistakes, and criticism. Discussion of other techniques such as visualization and hypnosis are included

The Self-Esteem Companion: Simple Exercises to Help You Challenge Your Inner Critic and Celebrate Your Personal Strengths. Matthew McKay, Patrick Fanning, Carole Honeychurch & Catharine Stuker, Oakland, CA: New Harbinger, 1999.

Ten Days to Self-Esteem. David D. Burns, NY: William Morrow, 1993. This workbook has many exercises focusing on the interrelationships of depression, anxiety and self-esteem. The emphasis is on self-exploration and on changing your moods through changing your thinking.

Cause: Constant criticism early in life; abuse or bullying by others.

Effect: Having low self esteem tends to make a person withdraw from social situations. You may feel you are in constant emotional turmoil and suffer from anxiety problems, eating disorders or depression. You may also find it difficult to function in social situations and impossible to accept compliments. People with low self esteem generally have low expectations from life and often neglect their physical and psychological health.

Solutions: Believe in a better opinion of yourself.

Do activities you enjoy on a regular basis.

Develop social skills and interact with other people.

Take credit for your successes.

Get Low Self Esteem Advice from our community.

Help with Debt and Overspending

People who overspend regularly are often trying to fill an emotional void. They get a buzz from shopping and feel a compulsive urge to keep spending money that they cannot afford.

You may feel guilty, anxious and depressed when you ring up large debts, and worry about how you will manage to pay them off. People who are in debt often continue to spend money as a form of escapism.

  • Do not stay in denial about your spending.
  • Keep a budget book and write down everything that you spend.
  • Contact a Debt Management Centre for advice on paying back your debts.
  • Do not buy things on impulse. Always think about purchases and take time to decide whether you really need it.
  • Avoid shopping centres and temptation.
  • Set strict limits on what you will spend each week and stick to them.

Coping with OCD

If you have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), you feel you have no control over certain thoughts, idea or urges, which seem to force themselves into your mind, like a stuck record. These thoughts – obsessions – are often frightening or distressing, or seem so unacceptable that you can’t share them with others. Contained within the obsession is an underlying belief that you, or other people, may come to harm. However absurd or unrealistic this belief, you can’t dismiss it or reason it away. It creates unbearable anxiety, and makes you feel helpless to do anything except perform the particular ritual which can neutralise the devastating thought.

The irresistible urge to carry out such rituals is known as a ‘compulsion’. This could be something like repeatedly opening and closing a door, washing hands, repeating a litany, or counting. In other words, exaggerated elements of everyday actions and routines. You may feel compelled to do these actions over and over again, because of an unquenchable fear that you didn’t do it properly last time, or because the unwanted thoughts intrude again. The relief from the anxiety is only temporary.

OCD is similar to a phobia, which is another anxiety disorder. In both cases, fear brings on symptoms of anxiety and panic, including a racing heart, churning stomach, dizziness, shortness of breath, sweating and trembling. A phobia also involves an exaggerated fear of something that doesn’t represent a realistic danger, but other people can usually relate to it, or even share it. But with OCD the fear is of your own thoughts, and other people may not be able to relate to this or understand them at all. What’s more, someone who has a phobia can avoid the thing that triggers their phobia, such as cats or spiders, but with OCD, these devastating thoughts are unavoidable, and are constantly ready to emerge.

OCD isn’t a psychotic disorder, such as schizophrenia, whereby people feel that certain thoughts and ideas come from somewhere outside themselves (hallucinations). If you have OCD, you know that it s your own thoughts tormenting you. Some people only experience obsessive thoughts, without having any compulsions. Others have compulsions without knowing why they feel the need to do them.

The anxiety caused by experiencing obsessions and compulsions feeds back into the problem, creating a vicious circle and making the OCD worse. Often, people with OCD are also depressed, and this may also be partly or wholly due to the experiene of OCD.

Causes: OCD sometimes occurs for no reason, but it may be triggered by stressful life events. It can be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain. It also tends to run in families, suggesting that some people have a genetic predisposition to OCD.

Effect: People with OCD are tormented by unwanted thoughts and feel compelled to carry out rituals to free themselves of these thoughts. For example, you may be very worried that there are germs on your hands, and to make yourself feel better you wash them. Washing relieves your anxiety for a while, so it becomes a ritual. This creates a vicious cycle and you might wash your hands twenty or more times an hour, even when your skin is raw from scrubbing. Other OCD behaviours include counting objects, checking switches are turned off and doors are locked, or rearranging furniture so it is symmetrical. If a person cannot carry out their rituals, they feel panicky and fear that a disaster will happen.

Explore these Possible Solutions

The first step is breaking the cycle. Remind yourself that your desire to carry out a ritual is a symptom of OCD, and will not protect you from harm. When you have resisted a compulsion a few times, it will get easier

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy may help

Anti-Depressants

Coping with OCD Help and Advice

Am I Having a Nervous Breakdown

Are You Experiencing a Nervous Breakdown?

Although it appears to be increasingly falling out of the common lexicon, the term “nervous breakdown” was once used to describe any number of mental health problems that appeared to strike suddenly. Unfortunately, the term is often used loosely or casually, and sometimes, as in films and TV, for comic effect. But is there really such as thing as a nervous breakdown? Well yes, and no.

Yes – a person can indeed ‘break down’ suddenly. The human body is a fragile mechanism that, when put under too much stress, will stop functioning normally. A person exposed to long-term, unrelenting severe stress is particularly vulnerable to experiencing a ‘breakdown.’ How does a breakdown manifest itself? The primary characteristic of a breakdown usually involves some sudden disintegration of the self. This means that an individual who usually follows a set pattern of behaviors will suddenly break away from their routine. Imagine this scenario: a person wakes every morning, goes to work, seems to function normally, visits with friends as usual, and then returns home. Imagine this person suddenly waking one morning and unable to get up. They have lost their drive, their ability to function normally, to communicate with family or friends. Perhaps they are even incapable of dressing or eating. This person is experiencing a nervous breakdown.

What other types of symptoms might be described as those associated with having a nervous breakdown? Some individuals might experience the uncontrollable need to cry, loss of energy, withdrawal, confusion, despair, inability to think clearly, sleep disruption or insomnia, loss of pleasure in everyday activities, feelings of worthlessness and depression. These “down and out” feelings are characteristic of depressive disorders.

Some individuals have breakdowns that manifest symptoms of psychosis. Breakdowns involving psychosis may involve hearing voices, seeing visions, feelings of paranoia, feelings of being pursued, feeling sensations that are not really present, grandiose or delusional behavior, bizarre public behavior, feeling of jealousy, and feelings of violence.

Whatever the nature of the breakdown, all breakdowns have in common the inability to function as normal.

What is a nervous breakdown really? A person who experiences symptoms of a nervous breakdown is suffering from some sort of mental disorder. That is, despite what we used to think, a nervous breakdown in and of itself is not an illness or disease. They are merely symptomatic of a larger problem. In fact, no legitimate physician or mental health professional would ever diagnose someone as having a nervous breakdown. The characteristics of a nervous breakdown can be symptomatic of a large variety of mental illnesses. The most common illness that resembles these characteristics is a Major Depressive episode. Other disorders that are related to what we think of as a nervous breakdown include panic attacks, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and other trauma disorders, acute stress disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder, depression, and mood disorders. All of these mental disorders are characteristic of what many laypeople would characterize as a nervous breakdown.

Who is most likely to suffer from a nervous breakdown? Almost anyone who is subjected to undue stress is capable of experiencing a nervous breakdown. For instance, any person who has been subjected to extreme stress and trauma is vulnerable to experiencing a disorder that mimics the general perception of a nervous breakdown. For instance, a young person returning from battle may experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. A woman experiencing severe depression after the birth of her child may experience post-partum depression.

How can a person suffering any of the characteristics of a nervous breakdown get help? Sometimes the hardest part of recovery is getting the person to visit a doctor. For some kinds of mental disorders, a nervous breakdown can be a blessing in disguise. An individual suffering from severe anxiety or depression may find her self speaking to a psychotherapist for the first time. A person who suffered alone for long time may suddenly find himself getting better with medical attention. In many fortunate cases, the person who experienced the nervous breakdown may emerge from therapy stronger and healthier than ever before. Treatments can include antidepressant and psychotropic medications, psychotherapy, and prescribed periods of rest.

Prevention of nervous breakdowns is an oft-ignored subject that researchers are beginning to study. The characterization of a nervous breakdown as something that happens very suddenly can be misleading. In many cases, symptoms of the coming breakdown are present, but either the individual or their family and friends ignore them. Individuals who sense themselves becoming increasingly stressed, depressed, angry, or violent are encouraged to seek help immediately.

Have you asked “Am I Having a Nervous Breakdown?” Discuss this in our forum

Help with Alcoholism

Possible Alcoholism Causes

People may use alcohol as a way of relaxing, coping with trauma, or numbing painful feelings. If this becomes a habit you might become addicted to alcohol and feel unable to cope with life when sober.

Effects of Alcoholism

You will feel a strong urge to drink. If your body becomes dependent on alcohol you will experience withdrawal symptoms when you try to stop, like sweating, nausea, agitation and shaking. Stopping suddenly can be fatal. Alcoholism may also cause hepatitis and cirrhosis of the liver, certain cancers, inflammation of the stomach and pancreas, high blood pressure, brain damage, heart failure, accidents due to being drunk, financial problems, loss of employment and relationship break-ups.

Try these Solutions to Alcoholism

  • Do not stop drinking suddenly. Talk to your doctor about starting a detox program
  • Think about why you started drinking heavily and address problems in your life
  • Group therapy
  • Psychotherapy
  • Medications such as Antabuse, which change the way your body reacts to alcohol and may help you give up

Get Help with Alcoholism in our Message Board

Dealing with Anger

Anger is a destructive state of mind which reacts to objects or situations in a negative way. In such situations, all the qualities of a person or an object seem unattractive and useless.This situation may be exaggerated to an extent where you build a negative or unpleasant image of the person or object that starts irritating you. In such conditions, you may even harm or criticize the faulty person. This is a very harmful situation which can cause many losses. This situation has no positive effects and only negative effects are there.

To avoid such situations, it is very important to watch the thoughts in your mind so that you may learn the cause and the origin of negative thoughts. Most of the time, anger arises due to health problems,alcohol or drug intake, family problems, financial problems, stress or social issues. You cannot always control these situations, but you can surely keep your mind calm to avoid a destructive situation like anger.

You can learn to control your anger and calm your mind by following a few anger management techniques. These techniques are well-tested on various patients and hence are quite reliable.

These are some of the negative effects of anger:

1. Anger may cause high stress, injury, high blood pressure and high pulse rate. These kinds of situations may lead to heart attack, stroke or even brain hemorrhage.

2. Anger may also result in various emotional swings like feelings of extreme guilt, hopelessness, anxiety and in acute cases, even suicide.

Anger is known to be an intense emotion and it is generally not an easy task to overcome this problem. However, with determined dedication and honest commitment you can help yourself to some extent. Sometimes, you may even need assistance and support of others. Below are some steps that may aid you in getting rid of this strong emotion.

You should be determined about your decision and have a strong will to free yourself from feelings of anger.

Try to be calm and do not jump to conclusions. In addition to this, you should always think before you react to a situation. Be expressive about your feelings. If there is something that you do not like, then you should communicate with others about it. Anger management is a gradual process, so you should not expect a change in yourself overnight. Every day, you should do things that relax your mind and body and keep yourself away from any stressful situations.

Anger management requires full dedication and determination. You also need to be patient about your recovery as it takes a lot of time to overcome anger and have a relaxed mind even in stressful conditions.

Get help dealing with anger and rage

Help with Anxiety Attacks

There’s a great deal of interest in how to stop panic attacks and anxiety without medication nowadays. In the main, sufferers just don’t want to be dependent on mind-numbing drugs such as antidepressants and tranquilizers for long periods of their lives. They would much prefer to handle things totally naturally.

Here you’ll learn of one such natural approach to eliminating your anxiety and panic attacks…

FOREWORD ON STOPPING PANIC ATTACKS AND ANXIETY WITHOUT MEDICATION

When considering how to stop panic attacks and anxiety without medication, there are several important things you should bear in mind…

(1). The first thing is that we aren’t dealing with a mental condition, rather we’re dealing with a behavioural one. You are not going mad. And, because it’s behavioural, it can be corrected with the proper guidance and information.

(2). Another consideration is that an attack cannot cause you any harm, you are perfectly safe. You may feel as though you are about to, but you won’t die. Your body is quite capable of handling the terrifying symptoms of an attack. In fact, it’s your body’s fight or flight response that triggers your attacks in the first place!

(3). Although you may think you lack courage, you certainly don’t. Remember that, on a daily basis, you face a range of challenges that the average person very rarely has to.

(4). Because of point (1) above, you don’t have to worry about being stuck with your anxiety problem for the rest of your life. It can be cured, with the correct approach. These are very important points to understand because they are all positive ones and so form a solid starting point for your cure.

MAINSTREAM TREATMENT FOR PANIC ATTACKS AND ANXIETY

You have no doubt visited your doctor and been diagnosed with general anxiety and panic attacks. And, as in most cases, you’ve been prescribed drugs, usually antidepressants, tranquilizers and even beta blockers. You may also have been referred to a therapist. The problem here is that neither of these address a fundamental aspect of your ongoing problem, and that is that they don’t address your fear of having another panic attack.

FEAR OF PANIC ATTACKS AND YOUR ANXIETY CYCLE

You see, your unconscious or conscious fear of your next attack can actually trigger such an attack. But where does this fear come from? It’s so simple really. The experience of your first attack was so terrifying that you live (consciously or subconsciously) in dread of another. This is understandable. The problem is that as long as this persists it only adds to your already high anxiety levels. So the key is to break out of this cycle of anxiety by getting rid of your fear of another panic attack. If you can do this then you are able to address your underlying general anxiety much more effectively and so eliminate it. But if mainstream treatment cannot do this effectively what other options are there?

HOW TO STOP PANIC ATTACKS AND ANXIETY WITHOUT MEDICATION

One serious option is to get rid of your fear of panic attacks by taking a counter-intuitive approach. By that I mean, instead of running away or hiding from your next panic attack, i.e. never putting yourself in a position where one might occur, you actually tackle your fear head-on. For example, try to make yourself have an attack right this second. I know that, try as hard as you might, you cannot. You’ve faced up to it. You met the challenge head on. And so the next time you feel an attack about to come on, recognize it for what it is. You now know what causes it. Know that it cannot harm you and will end shortly. Even repeat to yourself that you know what it is and that you aren’t in danger. And focus outwards on things around you, not inwards on your symptoms.

I’ve actually, in my head, told an attack when it began to ‘do its worst.’ In other words meet the attack head on and wrestle back control. There is no doubt that you can eliminate panic attacks and anxiety using totally natural techniques. And by now understanding that these attacks cannot cause harm and that your fear of them is what is actually holding you back, you are better positioned to go on and get your freedom back. So, no more fear of going out because of the fear of an attack, no more putting off holiday plans or business travel, no more fear of getting stuck in traffic or on trains, etc., and no more living a very trapped existence.

Get more help with anxiety attacks in our messageboard