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Apathy Definition, Help with Feelings of Apathy

Apathy Definition: Apathy (also called impassivity or perfunctoriness) is a state of indifference, or the suppression of emotions such as concern, excitement, motivation and passion. An apathetic individual has an absence of interest or concern to emotional, social, or physical life. They may also exhibit an insensibility or sluggishness.

Often, apathy has been felt after witnessing horrific acts, such as the killing or maiming of people during a war. It is also known to be associated with many conditions, some of which are: depression, Alzheimer’s disease, Chagas’ disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, dementia, Korsakoff’s Syndrome, excessive vitamin D, Hypothyroidism, general fatigue, Huntington’s disease, Pick’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), schizophrenia, Schizoid Personality Disorder, Bipolar Disorder and others. Some medications and the heavy use of drugs such as heroin may bring apathy as a side effect.

In positive psychology, apathy is described as a response to an easy challenge for which the subject has matched skills. The opposite of apathy is flow.

Been Dumped Advice

Breaking up is hard to do – but it’s something we all seem to go through at one time or another. Well most of us do anyway. It seems to affect us similarly whether we are young or old, famous or not, rich or poor and irrespective of where we are in the world. Below are a few suggestions that will hopefully help you decrease your recovery time and maybe minimize the amount of mistakes made along the way.

1) Don’t try to be their friend – make a “clean break”

As tempting as it is, if you are still in love with your EX, and he or she doesn’t reciprocate the feelings and intensity, then you’re better off making a clean break. I call it E.R. (”Emotional Rehab”) – which is basically just my way of saying “time to go cold turkey”.

Most people choose to ignore my advice, and remain their ex’s friend – somehow imagining if they do continue to be this wonderful, supportive friend, their EX will miraculously see the err of their ways – and take them back. That so seldom happens.

Now some of you will insist on remaining “friends” with your ex (or have to due to classes, jobs or children together), so if you are attempting this, be sure to set some ground rules. For example, do not discuss your former relationship, your new partners, or anything else that you know to be a potentially volatile subject. Resist every urge in you to ask those personal questions – most of the time the answers hurt! Keep conversations relevant to work, children or classes and away from any emotional topics. It is not easy, but it is achievable.

Eventually many non-believers come back to SYBD and say they finally had to take my advice and “cut contact”, because it really is too hard trying to be someone’s “buddy” – when you’re wanting more. This is especially true when your EX starts seeing someone new and starts asking you for advice (yes really!) or tries to share the gory details. No thanks. You’re better off saying – “I care for you, and maybe in time, when I am over the pain, we can resume a friendship.”

While it is rare, in some instances, absence DOES make the heart grow fonder and they do realize what they have been missing and reconciliation is on the cards. In others, the time apart actually serves to make you see the relationship for how it really was, and shocking as this may be to you right now, in time you just may realize you don’t want to be their friend after all! Finally, after you are over your EX and no longer harbor secret desires to get back together then you can really become “just friends”.

2) Do erase their telephone number from your mobile phone

As text messaging is such a HUGE thing, you’d be wise to delete their name and number from your mobile phone (and address book) straight away. You may also be able to bar their number from your phone too. Deleting your ex’s details will save you phoning or texting at 4am to ask “Why? Why? Why?” you were dumped, or save you from begging your ex, drunkenly, to take you back. That method seldom (if ever) works for reconciliation. It often has the adverse effect. Who enjoys getting woken up in the middle of the night by someone’s incoherent rantings? Or by being bombarded by text messages from someone that just doesn’t seem to get the hint.

3) Do delete their old emails and their handle from your online “buddy” lists

If you can bring yourself to DELETE all of the old emails between you, then do it. If that seems to drastic, at least put them onto a disc or burn them CD and put them somewhere where you won’t be tempted to continually re-read each one over and over. You just end up torturing yourself. I know I’ve done it!

Similarly to number two – remove and block them from your buddy lists. I know you think it’s a minor offense, even quite harmless, to keep in touch with your ex via email or instant messaging programs, but the only one you’re fooling is yourself. I’m guilty of that one too! Often you just end up spying on them, checking to see when they are on (and wondering who they are talking to if it’s not you!), analysing each message they send you, or worse yet, you get hurt when they tell you they are off “out” that night (and don’t say where). It’s an absolute nightmare, why put yourself through all that?

In a weird sort of way, keeping in touch electronically is a form of denial. It’s a way of staying in the relationship even when the other person isn’t physically there anymore.

After six months or so have passed, if you decide you want to, then you can add them back to your buddy list and allow them to see you again on theirs. Hopefully enough time will have past where you are better able to handle being in touch.

4) Don’t sit around staring at the mementos

Put away the letters, pictures and any personal belongings of your ex. Box them up and put them in a closet or somewhere equally out of sight. I have known some people to have ceremonial burnings, but that may be a bit drastic, and after you’re calmer and have healed, you may even regret it.

For starters, just box up all of the stuff until you feel ready to face it. Eventually you’ll be able to look at the holiday snaps without feeling sick to your stomach but not right now. In a year’s time, if you do still feel like torching the stuff, then do it somewhere safe – like the beach!

5) Do use a journal or notebook to vent your pain, anger, frustration & so forth

You should never underestimate the power of pouring the words out onto a page. This is even good for men. In fact, it’s generally exceptionally good for men, as a lot of men don’t have an outlet for their emotions and pain. During the healing process often we don’t feel like we are improving, and the notebook or diary will show you just how far you have come if you read it after a few weeks or months. It is incredibly cathartic and it just may stop you from saying things to your EX you may later regret. I highly recommend writing letters to your EX that you don’t actually send.

6) Do spoil yourself

This is something that both men and women can and need to do. Do something so simple as to having a manicure, facial or a massage. Or, maybe purchase that nifty gadget you’ve had your eye on. Both men and women can also benefit from picking up some new items of clothing that make us feel sexy. We all want to feel attractive. Treat yourself as you would want that someone ’special’ to treat you. Have candle lit dinners – with all of your favorite foods – just for you. You’re worth it.

7) Do buy new bedding & change your surroundings

It may sound silly but it’s very powerful step that you can take to cleanse the situation and start fresh. I have known some people to actually go out and buy whole new beds. If you can afford it, go for it. There is something to be said for sleeping in bedding with no history and no memories. The same can be said by changing the wallpaper or repainting an area – to make it more of your own. Surround yourself in your home with things that make you feel comfortable. Pictures of family and friends who really love you and support you are a very good start.

Don’t rebound

Give yourself plenty of time to heal from this break-up. Many people begin dating before they are really recovered. It is almost as if they get bored of the pain and the healing process, so they suddenly grab the next random person who happens to show a little kindness and BAM! It’s a fantastic theory but it doesn’t always work that way.

Try refrain from immediately trying to find someone to replace your EX and fill that void. Better to work through your pain fully before returning to the dating pool. While there is something to be said for rebound shags, they can sometimes do more harm than good. We’ve all heard “you can’t get over a man (or woman) until you get under another”. Don’t bet on it. Dating too soon often leads to comparisons to your EX, makes you feel lonelier than not dating did, and can actually set you back further, emotionally, than before you had started to date again. As much as we think this bright, sexy, intelligent person makes us feel so good, at the end of the day, they won’t really be able to fill this VOID in you. Only YOU can really make YOU happy. So the trick is to be happy within yourself before you start to date again.

9) Don’t listen to the negative self-talk

Once we have been dumped, there is a tendency slip into negative “self talk” and to worry about so many things: if we will ever be loved again, have sex again, trust again or perhaps we worry we are too old, too fat, too dumb or too anything…to ever be happy and fulfilled again. That is highly unlikely, so relax! Dispel thoughts like that immediately and replace them with positive affirmations of your own self worth.

Remember, just because your EX may no longer find you desirable or want to be in a relationship with you, doesn’t mean that no one else ever will. It just means your EX doesn’t. So what? You are still you. You are still whole, complete and perfect just as you are and it will do you good to keep reminding yourself of that.

10) Do take charge of your life – the world is your oyster

Use your time to alone to focus on yourself and your own goals in life. You can take a course in cooking, pick up a new hobby or learn seroc dancing – whatever you want. Buy a house, a motorcycle, travel the world, retrain for a new career or go for that promotion. The world is your oyster!

Get up off the sofa as soon as you can. While some regrouping time is necessary, at some point you should try to get in yourself back in shape and back in the land of the living. If you’ve lost a lot of weight (due to that lack of appetite!) then it’s time to put it back on – and vice versa. Start eating right and treating your body with the respect it deserves -it’s not the one who dumped you! Go running, walking, biking or to the gym to get the endorphins swimming through you. You’ll feel better if you do and you will project that to all you meet.

How will I know when I am really over my ex?” A good gauge is if you no longer harbor feelings and desires of getting back together. Not only that, but you can actually think of your EX having sex with someone else and it doesn’t feel like your heart’s just been ripped out of your chest and was stomped on.

Have you been dumped? Get advice from our friendly forum.

Being Jilted Help and Advice

Report: Being rejected increases many people’s motivation to pursue that elusive objective. But there’s a catch, say Stanford researchers. Being rebuffed, in fact, makes people less fond of what it is they think they want more. Once they obtain the desired goal, many are quicker to lose interest in it.

Playing hard to get is a timeworn technique for snagging that desired significant other. And there’s a reason, say Stanford researchers. Being rejected increases many people’s motivation to pursue that elusive objective—with a vengeance.

But there’s a catch. It turns out that being rebuffed, in fact, makes people less fond of what it is they think they want more. Once they obtain the desired goal, many are quicker to lose interest in it.

“For many people, wanting and liking are two separate things that can become contradictory,” says researcher Baba Shiv, professor of marketing at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. “When someone is thwarted from obtaining his original desire, he, in fact, comes to find the attractiveness and appeal of his target to be diminished. Yet, perversely, he may feel he wants it even more. The thrill becomes the chase.”

Those most susceptible to wanting the desired object more but liking it less, the authors found, are people who tend to feel and express emotions with a lower level of intensity. “People who are more hot-headed tend to respond to the denial experience by ramping down both their level of interest in the objective and their desire for it––their attitude becomes ‘it’s not so great, and I don’t want it anyway,” explains Ab Litt, a doctoral student at the Stanford Graduate School of Business who coauthored the study with Shiv and Uzma Khan, assistant professor of marketing. “There’s less contradiction because they’re more in tune with their raw feelings. They’re therefore more likely to make decisions that are going to make them happier in the long run.”

Interestingly, women in the study were more prone to the like less–want more syndrome than men. “That’s probably explained by the fact that they were somewhat less emotionally reactive than men,” suggests Litt. While women typically may experience and express emotions more richly, the researchers speculate, men may do so with more raw intensity, which influences how they take action on them.

In the study, participants were asked to solve several puzzles and were told that if their performance was in the top 25th percentile, they would receive a gift. Then, at random, some were told they had met the goal, while others were told that they had not.

Those who were denied the gift were then asked how much they would be willing to pay for it in a store. Participants who did not receive the gift were willing to pay more for it than those who later did actually receive it. “This shows that being rejected made them want it more,” says Shiv.

“Jilted” participants then completed a second set of tasks to obtain the same gift, and all were told they had won. They were subsequently asked whether they would like to trade the item for another of equal value. Significantly more subjects who had been denied the gift the first time were willing to trade it away than those who had received it on round one.

“This serves as a measure of how much they liked the item,” says Shiv. “Those who had been thwarted in getting it initially actually came to like it less. Being jilted causes people to want something more, but it also makes them feel more negative about it once they get it––and to not want to have anything to do with it.”

The study, to be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, has implications for product marketing as well as personal relationships. One traditional technique to increase demand for an item, for example, is to create an artificial shortage. “The study shows that this approach will be effective as long as people get the item without a good deal of problems,” says Shiv. “But if they’re constantly frustrated, having to stand in line or return to the store only to find the item still not there, they may desire it more but quickly lose interest in it once they have it. The long-term success of the product will be doomed.”

Meanwhile, singles in pursuit of Mr. or Mrs. Right may want to keep in mind that it’s good to play hard to get—as long as it doesn’t get too hard.

—Marguerite Rigoglioso

Being Jilted Help and Advice

Body Image Issues

Cause: Images in magazines of ‘perfect’ beauty, critical parents, bullying and having low self esteem. Facial disfigurement, hair loss, being overweight or underweight and illnesses such ascancer can also cause poor body image.

Effect: You might feel ashamed, self-conscious, anxious or obsessed with how your body looks to others. This may lead to eating disorders, self-neglect, self-hatred and destructiveness, and a fear of intimacy, as well as depression and anxiety disorders.

Solutions: Spend time with people who make you feel good about yourself.

Consider joining a support group.

Make a list of your good points- both physical and mental- and stick it next to your mirror.

Every day, read the list and focus on each thing you like about yourself.

Stop criticising yourself, as it will damage your body confidence further.

Think optimistic thoughts before you get to the mirror each day.

Dress in a way that makes you feel happy and comfortable. Use clothes to express your personality and show off your best features, and don’t try to squeeze into a smaller size.

Avoid looking at fashion magazines, and remember that most model pictures are the result of hours of make-up, specialist lighting and air-brushing.

Pamper your body with massage, long baths and lotions. Every now and then, splash out on a new perfume or manicure.

Take on challenges, like using a communal changing room or leaving the house with no make-up. Your confidence will grow.

Remember that it’s more important to be healthy than thin or perfect.

Enjoy physical sensations; the wind in your hair, sun on your skin, the freedom of running along a beach or breathing in crisp winter air.

Make time for gentle physical touch; hug your friends or hold hands with your partner.

Discuss your Body Image Issues

Coping with Anxiety

Ranges from mild, persistent worry to disabling fear and full-blown panic attacks.

Causes: Anxiety may be the result of a traumatic experience, a genetic predisposition, or an imbalance of brain chemicals. It can also occur for no apparent reason.

Effect: Generalized Anxiety Disorder causes you to feel restless, impatient and constantly ‘on edge’. You may suffer from panic attacks, dizziness, fatigue, palpitations, aching muscles, excessive sweating, digestive problems and insomnia.

Phobias are also a type of anxiety disorder. Someone with a specific phobia knows the exact trigger for their anxiety, for example spiders (arachnophobia), leaving the house (agoraphobia) or entering small spaces such as lifts (claustrophobia).

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder arises after a very traumatic or life-threatening event, and usually includes flash-backs.

Social Anxiety Disorder is diagnosed when a person experiences disabling anxiety in social situations.

Solutions:

Relaxation techniques are helpful in combating anxiety disorders. These include breathing exercises and meditation.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

Flooding and Exposure Therapy are techniques in which you are forced to confront the things you fear, either suddenly (for specific phobias) or gradually, until you no longer respond to the trigger with anxiety.

Medication may be prescribed when anxiety is severe.

Cutting out caffeine and nicotine may help.

Yoga and pilates.

Exercise such as brisk walking helps to reduce anxiety.

Anxiety disorders are serious medical illnesses that affect approximately 19 million American adults. These disorders fill people’s lives with overwhelming anxiety and fear. Unlike the relatively mild, brief anxiety caused by a stressful event such as a business presentation or a first date, anxiety disorders are chronic, relentless, and can grow progressively worse if not treated.

Effective treatments for anxiety disorders are available, and research is yielding new, improved therapies that can help most people with anxiety disorders lead productive, fulfilling lives. If you think you have an anxiety disorder, you should seek information and treatment.

This feature will help you identify the symptoms of anxiety disorders, explain the role of research in understanding the causes of these conditions, describe effective treatments, help you learn how to obtain treatment and work with a doctor or therapist, and suggest ways to make treatment more effective.

The anxiety disorders discussed in this feature arepanic disorder,

  • obsessive-compulsive disorder,
  • post-traumatic stress disorder,
  • social phobia (or social anxiety disorder),
  • specific phobias, and
  • generalized anxiety disorder.
  • Each anxiety disorder has its own distinct features, but they are all bound together by the common theme of excessive, irrational fear and dread.

Discuss coping with anxiety

Coping with Breaking Up

Divorce, being dumped or deciding to end a relationship yourself.

Breaking Up Effect: Grief, despair, anger, sadness, guilt and disappointment are all common emotions you may feel when a relationship ends. You might also feel hopeless, lonely, tearful and unable to cope with everyday life.

Breaking Up Depression and Sadness Solutions: Give yourself time to grieve for the lost relationship.

Express emotions by crying, shouting or talking about them, and surround yourself with close family and friends who will support you.

Remove obvious reminders of your partner, like photos or clothes he/she left behind. Put them in a box so you don’t keep catching sight of them.

Write a letter to your ex-partner describing how you feel about the break-up, but don’t send it. Destroy it, or read it each day until you start to heal.

Make a list of things you didn’t like about him/her and read it often.

Think about what you learned from the relationship- about yourself and any new experiences you had.

Spring clean your living space and social life. Make a fresh start by making the decision to move on; meet new people, make new friends and take up new activities.

Get help coping with breaking up

Coping with Grief and Bereavement

Causes: Grief is usually caused by the death of someone close to you, or losing someone you love due to divorce or a broken relationship.

Effect: Grief typically has four stages; Denial, Anger, Despair and Acceptance. In the Denial Stage, people usually feel numb with shock. The loss may not seem real to them. In the Anger Stage they are furious and resentful that the person they love has been snatched away. This is followed by Despair, when the person may feel acutely depressed and hopeless. Eventually they reach the stage of Acceptance, when they start to enjoy life again and adapt to living without the person. It may take some people many years to reach the stage of acceptance.

Grief also causes many physical symptoms. Nightmares, loss of appetite, sleep problems, breathlessness, uncontrollable crying, palpitations, anxiety attacks and fatigue are all common symptoms people have when they are grieving.

Solutions: Give yourself time to get over the loss, at your own pace.

You may find that talking helps a great deal.

Avoid using drugs or alcohol to numb the pain.

Take gentle exercise and eat a nutritious diet.

Enlist the company and support of friends and family.

Recall happy memories.

Keep a diary.

Counselling.

Talk to someone about Coping with Grief and Bereavement

Coping with OCD

If you have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), you feel you have no control over certain thoughts, idea or urges, which seem to force themselves into your mind, like a stuck record. These thoughts – obsessions – are often frightening or distressing, or seem so unacceptable that you can’t share them with others. Contained within the obsession is an underlying belief that you, or other people, may come to harm. However absurd or unrealistic this belief, you can’t dismiss it or reason it away. It creates unbearable anxiety, and makes you feel helpless to do anything except perform the particular ritual which can neutralise the devastating thought.

The irresistible urge to carry out such rituals is known as a ‘compulsion’. This could be something like repeatedly opening and closing a door, washing hands, repeating a litany, or counting. In other words, exaggerated elements of everyday actions and routines. You may feel compelled to do these actions over and over again, because of an unquenchable fear that you didn’t do it properly last time, or because the unwanted thoughts intrude again. The relief from the anxiety is only temporary.

OCD is similar to a phobia, which is another anxiety disorder. In both cases, fear brings on symptoms of anxiety and panic, including a racing heart, churning stomach, dizziness, shortness of breath, sweating and trembling. A phobia also involves an exaggerated fear of something that doesn’t represent a realistic danger, but other people can usually relate to it, or even share it. But with OCD the fear is of your own thoughts, and other people may not be able to relate to this or understand them at all. What’s more, someone who has a phobia can avoid the thing that triggers their phobia, such as cats or spiders, but with OCD, these devastating thoughts are unavoidable, and are constantly ready to emerge.

OCD isn’t a psychotic disorder, such as schizophrenia, whereby people feel that certain thoughts and ideas come from somewhere outside themselves (hallucinations). If you have OCD, you know that it s your own thoughts tormenting you. Some people only experience obsessive thoughts, without having any compulsions. Others have compulsions without knowing why they feel the need to do them.

The anxiety caused by experiencing obsessions and compulsions feeds back into the problem, creating a vicious circle and making the OCD worse. Often, people with OCD are also depressed, and this may also be partly or wholly due to the experiene of OCD.

Causes: OCD sometimes occurs for no reason, but it may be triggered by stressful life events. It can be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain. It also tends to run in families, suggesting that some people have a genetic predisposition to OCD.

Effect: People with OCD are tormented by unwanted thoughts and feel compelled to carry out rituals to free themselves of these thoughts. For example, you may be very worried that there are germs on your hands, and to make yourself feel better you wash them. Washing relieves your anxiety for a while, so it becomes a ritual. This creates a vicious cycle and you might wash your hands twenty or more times an hour, even when your skin is raw from scrubbing. Other OCD behaviours include counting objects, checking switches are turned off and doors are locked, or rearranging furniture so it is symmetrical. If a person cannot carry out their rituals, they feel panicky and fear that a disaster will happen.

Explore these Possible Solutions

The first step is breaking the cycle. Remind yourself that your desire to carry out a ritual is a symptom of OCD, and will not protect you from harm. When you have resisted a compulsion a few times, it will get easier

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy may help

Anti-Depressants

Coping with OCD Help and Advice

Coping with Panic Attacks

Cause: A Panic attack may be the result of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. They can also be caused by a specific phobic trigger, for example, if you have a phobia of spiders then seeing one may cause a panic attack. They can also occur for no obvious reason. Because a panic attack is a scary experience in itself, you fear having another, making the anxiety cycle worse.

Effect: During a panic attack, a person has an overwhelming sense of fear and may feel that they have lost touch with reality. Nausea, sweating, shaking, palpitations, a choking sensation and faintness are common symptoms, which usually peak within ten minutes.

Solutions: During a panic attack, it may be helpful to breathe in and out of your cupped hands, as this makes you re-breathe the excess oxygen you are taking in and reduces the frightening sensations of hyperventilation. Try to distract yourself by focusing on something you can see, or visualise yourself in a calm, safe place. Relaxation techniques such as yoga and meditation may help to prevent further attacks. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is another option, and SSRI antidepressants may help cases of severe Panic Disorder.

The help for a panic attack can come in a wide variety of forms. The most important first step for the individual sufferer is to form the determination to overcome the panic disorder. Once that has been accomplished, that individual will be able to live a life that is closer to normal.

A panic attack or a panic disorder frequently will result from a mental issue the person possesses. There are many varieties of panic attacks. They all seem to have one thing or another to do with the mind and the way an individual perceives things.

Doctors And Psychiatrists

We have determined that panic attacks result from our mental processes. Therefore, we need to consult with those doctors who have studied and learned about such things. Psychologists and psychiatrists are the primary specialists for people who suffer from panic disorders.

Seeking help for panic attacks disorders is something that individuals should do early on. The goal is to prevent the development of deeper issues and conditions. Those issues and conditions often are connected to panic disorders.

Our medical doctors usually will recommend the traditional methods of help for panic attack disorders. These traditional methods usually involve some therapy combined with medication.

The intention is to get the individual on the road to recovery, wellness and stability. You can expect the doctor to make a preliminary assessment before prescribing any methods of help for panic attacks.

Alternative Help For Panic Attacks

Alternative medicine has several different remedies for how to cure panic attacks. Alternative medicine usually places the focus more on the natural ways to treat these disorders.

Customarily herbs and some alternative methods are prescribed for people seeking help for panic attack disorders. There are numerous herbs that can naturally combat the anxious and fearful feelings people get during panic attacks.

In addition to the herbs, there are the alternative methods such as massage, aromatherapy, hypnosis, acupuncture and countless others. These alternative methods to provide help forpanic attacks disorders can be helpful to a certain extent.

There are several forms of panic attacks that cannot be treated readily with the alternative methods. That is because it takes time for some of the alternative methods to be effective. A few of these methods, such as hypnosis, can have lasting effects on people.

Get help coping with panic attacks

Dealing with Anger

Anger is a destructive state of mind which reacts to objects or situations in a negative way. In such situations, all the qualities of a person or an object seem unattractive and useless.This situation may be exaggerated to an extent where you build a negative or unpleasant image of the person or object that starts irritating you. In such conditions, you may even harm or criticize the faulty person. This is a very harmful situation which can cause many losses. This situation has no positive effects and only negative effects are there.

To avoid such situations, it is very important to watch the thoughts in your mind so that you may learn the cause and the origin of negative thoughts. Most of the time, anger arises due to health problems,alcohol or drug intake, family problems, financial problems, stress or social issues. You cannot always control these situations, but you can surely keep your mind calm to avoid a destructive situation like anger.

You can learn to control your anger and calm your mind by following a few anger management techniques. These techniques are well-tested on various patients and hence are quite reliable.

These are some of the negative effects of anger:

1. Anger may cause high stress, injury, high blood pressure and high pulse rate. These kinds of situations may lead to heart attack, stroke or even brain hemorrhage.

2. Anger may also result in various emotional swings like feelings of extreme guilt, hopelessness, anxiety and in acute cases, even suicide.

Anger is known to be an intense emotion and it is generally not an easy task to overcome this problem. However, with determined dedication and honest commitment you can help yourself to some extent. Sometimes, you may even need assistance and support of others. Below are some steps that may aid you in getting rid of this strong emotion.

You should be determined about your decision and have a strong will to free yourself from feelings of anger.

Try to be calm and do not jump to conclusions. In addition to this, you should always think before you react to a situation. Be expressive about your feelings. If there is something that you do not like, then you should communicate with others about it. Anger management is a gradual process, so you should not expect a change in yourself overnight. Every day, you should do things that relax your mind and body and keep yourself away from any stressful situations.

Anger management requires full dedication and determination. You also need to be patient about your recovery as it takes a lot of time to overcome anger and have a relaxed mind even in stressful conditions.

Get help dealing with anger and rage